Ella Frances Sanders
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Eating the Sun

book

Eating the Sun: Small Musings on a Vast Universe

 
 “Feeds the curiosity of anyone interested in exploring the universe that we exist in.” —   Scientific American

“Feeds the curiosity of anyone interested in exploring the universe that we exist in.” — Scientific American

   Purchase the book     An illustrated exploration of the principles, laws, and wonders that rule our universe, our solar system, our world, and our daily lives, from the  New York Times  bestselling creator of     Lost in Translation    .   Our universe is full of wonderful mystery. Many of us go through life without ever really quite knowing why we have seasons or discovering why the moon never leaves us. If we don’t go looking, we may never realize the precise angle at which the Earth is tilted, may never glance at the sky and recognize the clouds by name. As our civilization whirls faster than ever, there is comfort and amazement to be found in knowing how and why. This book is filled with those moments of awe and delight—the beautiful clarity that comes with knowing why the trees never forget to blossom and why our orbit around the sun is slightly elliptical rather than perfectly circular, accompanied by whimsical illustrations infused with every bit of this magic.  Delicately existential in a way that makes you pause and think and gasp in wonder,   Eating the Sun   is an accessible, beautiful book for people of any age, from anywhere in the world (or beyond).

Purchase the book

An illustrated exploration of the principles, laws, and wonders that rule our universe, our solar system, our world, and our daily lives, from the New York Times bestselling creator of Lost in Translation.

Our universe is full of wonderful mystery. Many of us go through life without ever really quite knowing why we have seasons or discovering why the moon never leaves us. If we don’t go looking, we may never realize the precise angle at which the Earth is tilted, may never glance at the sky and recognize the clouds by name. As our civilization whirls faster than ever, there is comfort and amazement to be found in knowing how and why. This book is filled with those moments of awe and delight—the beautiful clarity that comes with knowing why the trees never forget to blossom and why our orbit around the sun is slightly elliptical rather than perfectly circular, accompanied by whimsical illustrations infused with every bit of this magic.

Delicately existential in a way that makes you pause and think and gasp in wonder, Eating the Sun is an accessible, beautiful book for people of any age, from anywhere in the world (or beyond).

  Praise for Eating the Sun   “Sanders elucidates many of the wonders of our world . . . Each inspiring snapshot feeds the curiosity of anyone interested in exploring the universe that we exist in and that exists in us.” —   Scientific American    “With this pairing of witty illustrations and an open-weave narrative—strong on science but just this side of poetry—Ella Frances Sanders has penned a pocket-sized book vast in ambition.” —   Nature    “Sanders beautifully personifies the universe with lyrical prose and whimsical color illustrations . . . poetic yet scientifically illuminating . . . Sanders renders [scientific] language both accessible and appealing to her audience. Even more importantly, she consistently captures a sense of awe and wonder at the universe, and ignites (or reignites) that same sense in the reader.” —     Publishers Weekly (starred review)    “A wonder-filled excursion into the sometimes-baffling and formidable world of science. . . . Presenting information in a charming, conversational style, the author seeks to demystify science with panache. . . . A fun, accessible introduction to a variety of scientific topics that readers can explore further.” —     Kirkus Reviews    “In this sweet and optimistic new book, author-illustrator Sanders explores the sweeping science of the universe and then breaks it down so that even right-brainers and hopeless romantics can comprehend. . . . Unique and delightful . . . Sanders’s marveling is inspiring and sure to be contagious, even for the least scientifically minded of readers.” —   Booklist    “[Eating the Sun] blends grand scientific principles with an everyday perspective, juxtaposing the cosmic with the quotidian.” —   Read it Forward    “From the author of Lost in Translation, a captivating compendium of words untranslatable into English, comes another wondrous read: Eating the Sun: Small Musings on a Vast Universe. This slim but remarkable volume by Ella Frances Sanders explores the marvels of the universe, from the very tiny (atoms and cells) to the very large (supercluster galaxies). Comprised of short chapters no more than a couple pages each, the book eschews hard science for more elementary facts that read like poetry. “You are made from the remnants of stars,” Sanders writes. “Strung up like fairy lights... the stars are to thank for your singular fragile body.” She goes on to explain in equally lyrical prose how every living thing on Earth contains carbon from the cosmos. In the standout chapter “I'll be Where the Blue Is,” Sanders explains that “blue as a color in nature is actually incredibly elusive,” because it's produced by a trick of light. The natural magic trick is responsible for the color of the North American blue jay as well as the sky on a summer day. Like its predecessor, Eating the Sun is full of word appreciation. In Sanders’s chapter about the orbits of planets, she writes that “we should be glad that orbits are not perfectly circular” because it allows us to describe the phenomenon as “perihelion,” a word that's “enough to make a person weak at the knees.” Between the chapters are colorful drawings that, like her writing, encourage a childlike awe. Discover: This slim but lyrical exploration of the universe elicits poetry and awe out of science.” —   Shelf Awareness

Praise for Eating the Sun

“Sanders elucidates many of the wonders of our world . . . Each inspiring snapshot feeds the curiosity of anyone interested in exploring the universe that we exist in and that exists in us.” — Scientific American

“With this pairing of witty illustrations and an open-weave narrative—strong on science but just this side of poetry—Ella Frances Sanders has penned a pocket-sized book vast in ambition.” — Nature

“Sanders beautifully personifies the universe with lyrical prose and whimsical color illustrations . . . poetic yet scientifically illuminating . . . Sanders renders [scientific] language both accessible and appealing to her audience. Even more importantly, she consistently captures a sense of awe and wonder at the universe, and ignites (or reignites) that same sense in the reader.” — Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“A wonder-filled excursion into the sometimes-baffling and formidable world of science. . . . Presenting information in a charming, conversational style, the author seeks to demystify science with panache. . . . A fun, accessible introduction to a variety of scientific topics that readers can explore further.” — Kirkus Reviews

“In this sweet and optimistic new book, author-illustrator Sanders explores the sweeping science of the universe and then breaks it down so that even right-brainers and hopeless romantics can comprehend. . . . Unique and delightful . . . Sanders’s marveling is inspiring and sure to be contagious, even for the least scientifically minded of readers.” — Booklist

“[Eating the Sun] blends grand scientific principles with an everyday perspective, juxtaposing the cosmic with the quotidian.” — Read it Forward

“From the author of Lost in Translation, a captivating compendium of words untranslatable into English, comes another wondrous read: Eating the Sun: Small Musings on a Vast Universe. This slim but remarkable volume by Ella Frances Sanders explores the marvels of the universe, from the very tiny (atoms and cells) to the very large (supercluster galaxies). Comprised of short chapters no more than a couple pages each, the book eschews hard science for more elementary facts that read like poetry. “You are made from the remnants of stars,” Sanders writes. “Strung up like fairy lights... the stars are to thank for your singular fragile body.” She goes on to explain in equally lyrical prose how every living thing on Earth contains carbon from the cosmos. In the standout chapter “I'll be Where the Blue Is,” Sanders explains that “blue as a color in nature is actually incredibly elusive,” because it's produced by a trick of light. The natural magic trick is responsible for the color of the North American blue jay as well as the sky on a summer day. Like its predecessor, Eating the Sun is full of word appreciation. In Sanders’s chapter about the orbits of planets, she writes that “we should be glad that orbits are not perfectly circular” because it allows us to describe the phenomenon as “perihelion,” a word that's “enough to make a person weak at the knees.” Between the chapters are colorful drawings that, like her writing, encourage a childlike awe. Discover: This slim but lyrical exploration of the universe elicits poetry and awe out of science.” — Shelf Awareness

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